Media release – World Down Syndrome Day highlights barriers to full inclusion

New Zealanders with Down syndrome continue to face unsurmountable barriers stopping them from being fully included in their community.
“The reality for people with Down syndrome in 2022, is that they still face daily battles to fully participate and contribute to society,” says Zandra Vaccarino, the National Executive of the New Zealand Down Syndrome Association (NZDSA).
The global theme for this year’s World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD), on March 21, is #Inclusion Means.
“The theme was chosen to make people consider and understand what full inclusion actually means,” says Vaccarino.
“Inclusion can mean a lot of different things for people with Down syndrome, but also for the people around them. What inclusion looks like should always be considered in the human rights framework and then one should explore how one can be inclusive in all aspects of life including employment, education, sport, arts, community participation and social events.”
Vaccarino says that by signing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, New Zealand has obligations to uphold the intent of the UNCRPD but this has not translated into full community participation, or the privileges and rights other Kiwi citizens may take for granted.
“Inclusion is not just having people with Down syndrome present in our schools, our streets or our malls. It means that we need to give them equitable access, so they have real access and support where needed to fully participate in all parts of our society,” says Vaccarino, who hopes that this year’s campaign will encourage New Zealanders to take stock and see how they can better include people with Down syndrome in their schools, work places, sports teams and social events.
This year, Covid 19 restrictions have again stopped Down syndrome groups around the country from hosting their usual WDSD celebrations, so the NZDSA has pulled together a mega-online community event, The Big Connect, which on Monday night will host a who’s-who from the disability sector.
The Big Connect will be opened by the Minister for Disability Issues, the Honourable Carmel Sepuloni, before she hands the stage to the President of Down Syndrome International, Bridget Snedden, and Paula Tesoriero, the Disability Rights Commissioner.
Snedden and Tesoriero will then be part of an intriguing panel of high-profile experts and advocates around human rights, education, employment, sports and arts to discuss the WDSD theme #Inclusion Means.
Vaccarino says that Covid restrictions last year forced the NZDSA to come up with the first Big Connect, which turned out to be a huge success.
“Last year, over 100 families from all over the country joined us and they were all really excited about being connected.
“People with disabilities are often more isolated than others during the pandemic, so we really hope that we get an even bigger turnout this year.”
“We are incredibly proud and grateful to host such an amazing group to share their ideas and experiences around inclusion and we hope the discussion will be an inspiration for people with Down syndrome and the wider community,” says Vaccarino.

For more information, contact Zandra Vaccarino on 021-1587150.

You do not want to miss New Zealand’s biggest Down syndrome video call on March 21.

The theme of this year’s World Down Syndrome Day, is “What does inclusion mean?” which we would also like to expand to” What do I want in the future?”.

This year the NZDSA is calling on you to tell us what inclusion means to you or what you want for your future.

We invite people with Down syndrome, their whānau, carers, support people and anyone else in our community to share with us your thoughts and aspirations — this could be by sending us a video, a written message, a photograph or even a drawing!

We will be sharing your stories on social media over the next three weeks and asking a few of you to speak at The Big Connect.

You can send the NZDSA messages on Facebook or email us at [email protected]

While our people are spread throughout all corners of Aotearoa and unable to connect in person, we believe The Big Connect will be a great way to celebrate our community and ensure we are all together to celebrate World Down syndrome Day.

The Big Connect is Back – Monday 21st March 2022 at 7pm

In 2021, the New Zealand Down Syndrome Association hosted the first BIG CONNECT, the country’s largest zoom call, to celebrate World Down Syndrome Day. Join us on Monday the 21st March at 7pm for another star-studded zoom event as we explore Inclusion means# the 2022 theme for World Down Syndrome Day.

Topic:     Big Connect

Date:    21 March 2022

Time:    07:00 PM

Join Zoom Meeting

Meeting ID: 861 9763 8020

Passcode: 988116

Other Online Events to Mark World Down Syndrome Day

Down Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder – A dual diagnosis. Thursday 24th March at 7pm 

This session will include the launch of a new digital resource “Down Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder”.  This digital resource is presented by Geraldine (Dina) Whatnell and she provides an overview, offers information, shares insights and demonstrates best practice when supporting people with Down syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

This online session will also include a Q&A time with Geraldine.

Geraldine Whatnell is the Nurse Practitioner Mental Health and Addictions Service, Palmerston North Hospital. Geraldine brings with her nearly forty years of professional skills and knowledge in the specialist area of developmental disabilities (intellectual disabilities and/or Autism Spectrum Disorder) and mental health.

Topic: Down Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder – A dual diagnosis

Date:   24 March, 2022

Time: 07:00 PM Auckland, Wellington

Join Zoom Meeting

Meeting ID: 861 9318 1571

Passcode: 034268

UpsideDowns, New Zealand Down Syndrome Association, and Small Talk Therapy, are proud to bring you this free webinar on speech and language therapy for children and young people with Down syndrome.

Are you looking for ways to support your child’s speech during lockdown?

Are you new to speech and language therapy?

Have you been engaging with speech and language therapy for a long time but are looking for new ways to engage with your child’s communication journey?

Are you frustrated or confused by what public speech therapy is being provided? Are you keen to start with speech and language therapy but don’t know where to begin?

If you’ve answered yes to any of these questions, then this webinar is for you!

Fiona Kenworthy, a specialist in speech and language therapy for children with Down syndrome, Sarah Paterson-Hamlin, CEO of UpsideDowns, and Zandra Vaccarino, National Executive Officer of the New Zealand Down Syndrome Association, are answering questions from over 100 families, followed by a brief presentation by Fiona on some tips and tricks for lockdown SLT.

 

Please login or purchase a subscription to get full access to resources.