There’s a huge gap at Hirepool in Lower Hutt where Colin Bailey used to work. He’s retired from the Hutt Road branch after more than 30 years on the job.

Colin’s farewell barbeque was an emotional day for everyone as Hirepool staff from across Wellington, along with Regional Manager Stuart Drew from Hawke’s Bay, came to say goodbye.

“He does leave a gap here – 100 percent,” Stuart says. “He swept the yard, kept it clean. No-one did it as well as he did. His work here was exceptional. He brought an excellent work ethic, a great sense of humour, a cheekiness.”

Stuart says he’ll miss Colin sneaking up on him and giving him a punch in the ribs. “It wasn’t just work; we were part of his extended family.”

He says employing Colin had been a success and Colin had worked to make it a success. “Years ago, someone came up with a great idea and he has stayed with us all that time. Colin still had to earn his way, which he did.”

Colin at his workstation. Photo: IHC

Wellington Area Manager Rod Groombridge worked with Colin for only seven or eight years but has known him far longer through Special Olympics New Zealand. Colin was a champion swimmer and Rod’s mother, Carol Groombridge, was the organisation’s first national secretary.

Rod says Colin was held in high regard by all the staff and treated as an equal. He says that was obvious in how many turned up to his farewell. A special sign reading ‘Colin’s Wash Room’ was hung over his work area.

“It was a funny old day. It was emotional really. We made that sign and we retired his broom.”

Colin had worked at Hirepool for longer than any of the team and through many of its former lives on the site – Projex, Hirequip and then Hirepool.

Hirequip used to hire out heavy equipment and when the trucks, diggers and huge road-sealing compactors came back clogged in mud Colin scoured their outsides with a water blaster and gave their cabs a dust-off ready for the next customer. He worked in all weather in gumboots, mask, leggings and a beanie to keep warm. In 2009 Hirequip presented him with a long-service award.

Hirequip’s successor, Hirepool, relocated the heavy machinery to another location and Colin switched gears. “I washed everything, the whole lot – washed all the gear, lawnmowers and rotary hoes.”

Colin started at Projex in 1985 or 1986, on work experience. He then took a year off to do the vocational life skills course at Petone Weltech before heading back to work.

Lee Bailey, Colin’s mother, says he got the job through IHC, working one day a week at the start. Before long “he was doing five days and he wanted to do six, but we put our foot down”.

This was a big commitment for Lee. “I would get up at 5.30am to get him to work. He went at 7am and was picked up at 2pm,” she says.

Last year, however, things changed. Although Colin’s job was waiting for him after lockdown, he was 59 and becoming increasingly tired. “Yeah, I would go home and sleep,” Colin says. As well, his father Ken died in September and Colin and Lee were having to adjust to the changes.

Lee, now 80, says she is glad to give up the early start. And Colin enjoys helping Lee around the house and mowing the lawns. He usually visits his old workmates once a week.

Source: IHC

 

NZDSA MEDIA RELEASE

The New Zealand Down Syndrome Association (NZDSA) urgently calls on the Government to invest in disability attitude training for health professionals.

A deeply disturbing article in the Sunday-Star Times yesterday clearly articulated and emphasised the traumatic discrimination many families experience during pre-natal screening tests, as well as the pressure to terminate their pregnancies by medical professionals.

In the story, one expectant mother explains that as she was heading into theatre to have her baby delivered by caesarean, she was asked if she would want the doctor to resuscitate her baby if it was required.

“The stories from these parents once again demonstrates how parents feel pressurised and that information is not presented in a balanced way, nor are expectant parents provided with up-to-date information about Down syndrome,” says NZDSA president Kim Porthouse.

Porthouse says that most health professionals have no first-hand experience of living with Down syndrome and may not even be aware of the unconscious bias they bring to conversations with expectant parents.

“Because they have never met any people with Down syndrome living amazingly full and rewarding lives, they often revert back to a clinical health discussion that presents a doomsday scenario of potential health risks that may never eventuate.

“The parents are in shock, and in many cases termination is presented as the only logical option before parents even have time to process all the information,” says Porthouse

The NZDSA has consistently called for the National Screening unit to invest into disability attitudinal training for health practitioners, as well as focused training on how to offer screening and share screening results in a non-directive manner and to provide accurate and up-to-date information on Down syndrome.

“We have been asking for this for many years, but it still has not happened. It is such a sensitive moment so it is also important to offer expectant parents non-directive counselling to help them make their decision, but this is not available,” says the NZDSA president.

Porthouse says that people with Down syndrome are valued members of every community they live in, but for some reason medical professionals are determined to ignore the social aspects of the discussions.

“Down syndrome in itself should not be a reason to terminate a pregnancy. The way a society thinks about people with disability underpins everything,” says Porthouse, who emphasises that the NZDSA is not challenging a woman’s right to make her own decision, “but we just want them to be able to make a fully informed decision”.

The discrimination and stigma in society does not stop once the baby is born, judging by the recent experiences of Bridie Allen, parent of two-year-old Sienna.

“After the birth of my daughter, some people asked if I didn’t get the screening, as if there had been some mistake,” says Allen.

Porthouse says that this type of question confirms the discriminatory assumption by many in our society that expectant parents would terminate.

“And let’s not forgot how hurtful this unconscious bias in society must be to people with Down syndrome, who are told that their lives don’t really matter,” says Porthouse.

Vincenzo Vaccarino is a young man with Down syndrome from Palmerston North and he says the pre-natal screening discussions make him feel “very bad and uncomfortable”.

“It makes me feel very sad to hear that parents choose not to have babies with Down Syndrome,” says Vincenzo, who married his girlfriend Rachel two years ago.

“I think it is cruel. People should consider the rights of people with Down Syndrome, we have the same human right to live, like every other person.”

 

 

 

 

 

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IHC has launched an exciting new service that will be helpful to many families with Down syndrome, especially in the more remote parts of the country.

IHC has create a new volunteering role called, i-Volunteer, which is an extension of its existing volunteer friendships and our Volunteer Programme in where we connect people to form friendships and engage in their communities.

i-Volunteer is an digital version which links volunteers with people with intellectual disabilities, but the connection is online and by phone.

ICH has also extended the service to include family carers of someone with an intellectual disability, and that friendship is online and by phone as well.

The beauty of this new online volunteer role is that it allows IHC to target regions where it does not currently operate because they don’t have a Volunteer Coordinator on the ground.

The new service allows IHC to also target remote areas such as farming communities or the West Coast of the South Island.

I-Volunteer is all about shared interests and doing what each person enjoys and wants to do as a part of their friendship together.

Things that volunteers and their friends have talked about doing together are:

  • trying a new recipe and cooking it together over zoom
  • exercising and watching yoga YouTube videos together
  • playing multi-player online games such as Animal Crossing or Minecraft
  • knit or craft while on zoom or skype
  • ‘visit’ zoos (for example logging onto the live webcam on the San Diego zoo website); or
  • just chatting over the phone.

 

The initial interest among volunteers has been encouraging and has already resulted in several new i-Volunteers undergoing our orientation and training process in readiness for a friendship match.

Their interests range from travel, sports, learning Spanish, to video games, movies, creative writing and cooking and photography.

Their individual skills and experiences indicate they will be a committed and valued friend to a person with intellectual disability, or to a family carer of a person with intellectual disability.

IHC is looking for referrals from people who would like an online volunteer friend, so any families that might be interested please contact Belinda Donaldson at IHC 0800 442 311 or

[email protected]

 

 

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The New Zealand Down Syndrome Association is extremely proud of Michael Holdsworth becoming a member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in this week’s Queen’s Birthday Honours.
The NZDSA believes Michael is the first person with Down syndrome in New Zealand to receive this kind of honour.
Michael was recognised for his decades of work for Special Olympics and his advocacy work for full inclusion of people with Down syndrome in their community in New Zealand.
NZDSA President Kim Porthouse says that Michael has been a trailblazer for people with Down syndrome, both during his education in mainstream schools and his employment with IHC.
“Michael has been a great role model and has helped to remove a lot of barriers for people with Down syndrome,” says Ms Porthouse,
“Aside from that, he is also an accomplished musician and his piano performances have been a regular feature during the NZDSA National Achievement Awards at Government House,” says Ms Porthouse, adding that Michael himself was a recipient of the National Achievement Award in 2012.


“Every person with Down syndrome and their families in New Zealand will be extremely proud of Michael’s achievements and it is wonderful to see this recognised in the Queen’s Birthday honours.”
Michael represented New Zealand at the World Down Syndrome Conference in Dublin, Ireland, in 2009 to share his story of advocacy and inclusion.
He has been involved with Special Olympics for 32 years, as an athlete, advocate and as a Global Ambassador, and has been working for IHC in the library for almost 27 years, being the helpful voice at the end of line for people looking for resources.
The Special Olympics swimmer and skier says he is very honoured.
“With all the years of Special Olympics it has been the best thing of my sport,” he says.
The NZDSA President says that Michael is yet another example of the amazing things people with Down syndrome can achieve.
“More and more people and organisations are starting to realise what people with Down syndrome are capable off and what a great asset they are to their community.
“Michael has been one of the trailblazers and we are excited to see so many other young people following his footsteps.”

My name is Edward Borkin and I have always lived with Mum and Dad, but I was independent when they went away.

I have been working at Pak n Save Botany for the last 19 years as a trolley boy.

I am also a member of STRIVE which consists of members with Down syndrome who help to advocate for people with disabilities. I enjoy being part of it and helping others with disabilities.

Another thing that I am involved with is Special Olympics. I participate in ten-pin bowling, swimming and table tennis.

I have recently moved into a flat with David, he has a disability too. We get on like a house on fire!

We share the chores and help each other. We also share some of the same interests like Coronation Street and music.

I have a support worker and try to be as independent as possible. I do need some help with cooking as it’s not really my forte.

I’m learning to catch the bus to work which will help me to be even more independent.

I’m really enjoying flatting!

Message from Hon Carmel Sepuloni MP, Minister for Disability Issues.

This week Health Minister Andrew Little announced reforms to the Health System in New Zealand, in response to the Health and Disability System Review.

Our Health and Disability System has not performed consistently in providing quality health care and equitable health outcomes for the disabled community.

The announcement states that we are undertaking work on system transformation for disability support services (DSS), in partnership with the disabled community and based on the vision and principles of the Enabling Good Lives approach. Decisions on the transformed system and the machinery of government to support it will be taken in September this year.

However, disabled people have a strong interest in ensuring that the broader health system works for them, addresses health inequities and improves outcomes. The disabled community will be an important voice in these reforms, which will help to build a stronger Health System that delivers for all.

I wanted to take the opportunity to provide you with some additional information on our next steps.

If you have any further questions, please don’t hesitate to get in contact via[email protected] and I will ensure your questions are answered.

What’s changing? Why?

The shift from 20 District Health Boards to a single nationwide health system managed by Health NZ will improve the quality and consistency of care for disabled people.

A national coordinated network will also help ensure best practice care is shared amongst all disabled communities, and that care does not vary depending on where you live.

The Disability Strategy will remain a cornerstone of our health system, and direct the Ministry of Health, Māori Health Authority and Health NZ in delivering improved health outcomes for disabled communities.

The Government has yet to decide the future of DSS following feedback from the disabled community on the Health and Disability System Review. The Ministries of Health and Social Development will provide advice on the future of DSS later this year. That advice will follow further work with the disabled community based on the principles of Enabling Good Lives and advice developed as part of the machinery of government review of DSS.

What will it look like in future?

A wider range of primary and community care services will be available across New Zealand, developed to be more inclusive of disabled people.

A stronger consumer voice in the design of locality services and planning will give disabled people opportunities to shape services that better suit their needs and help them stay well in the community. The networking and integration of primary and community services will also make care more coordinated, minimising repetition, and ensuring carers have a better understanding of users’ needs.

Health NZ will create avenues to advocate nationally to ensure best practice and service design reflect the diverse interests and needs of disabled people.

When more specialised care is needed, disabled people will have access to high quality hospital and specialist care regardless of where they live in New Zealand.

What’s next?

Over coming months there will be opportunities to influence the details of how our future health system will work, including how we can ensure that Health NZ acts to continuously improve the quality and consistency of care for disabled people, across our health system.

As noted above, further decisions on the future of DSS will be made by the end of 2021.

Want to know more?

Further information about the work and progress of the health reforms is available on the DPMC website under the work of the Transition Unit: www.dpmc.govt.nz/our-business-units/transition-unit.

Regards

Carmel Sepuloni

Hon Carmel Sepuloni

Email [email protected]

 

Office of Hon Carmel Sepuloni MP, Minister for Social Development & Employment, Minister for Disability Issues, Minister for ACC and Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage

By Rebekah Williamson

PHAB is a little organisation with a big impact.

PHAB primarily provides social groups for people of all abilities, across Auckland. We are always looking for new ways to engage with our community.

We have been doing a Girls Day Out annually, but after talking to many families we came to realise that the day-to-day routines for our mothers and daughters often revolved around care, and we wanted to provide a day that was uniquely about their relationship: bonding, learning and being together.

 

The recent Mothers and Daughters Day started with a cooked breakfast at the PHAB building, all the families came together and before long we were in taxis and off to our main activity for the day: Aerial circus for the day at the Dust Palace.

Kathleen Derrick. Photos: Natasha H’ng

We chose the Dust Palace in particular because of the large and varied range of costumes that they had, as we wanted everyone to walk away with photographic memories from the day.

Dust Palace was amazingly professional, and provided just the right amount of support, exceptional safety and empowerment to allow the participants on the day to grow in confidence as they explored the apparatus.

After lunch everyone dressed in costumes and got their time in the limelight for their photoshoots with their photographer Natasha H’ng.

Deborah and Faith Van Heeswyck

The afternoon was finished off at Kiwi Nails and Spa in Takapuna and cake and drinks.

We were lucky to have support from the Louisa and Patrick Emmett Murphy foundation, who saw the value in providing this special day and supported us to do so.

We are grateful to everyone who made this day happen. We are especially grateful to the Mothers and Daughters who were simply inspirational.